Ep. 7 Food Waste: We are all Responsible

Food Waste: We are all Responsible
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Food Waste: We are all Responsible

I have previously blogged on food waste and how to reduce food waste in your home (Read the blog here) so today, I don’t want to go into the how, today, I really want to go into the why. We are all responsible for the future of this planet and the quality of life we all experience during our time on this Earth, anyone who throws their hands up in the air and declares the problem too big for one person, then does nothing needs to have a good hard look at themselves.

I’m def’s feeling a bit ranty on this topic. The problem is deep and to me goes to the core of our responsibilities as humans. Here are some of the facts about our Food system and Food Waste, just in case you are unaware of how bad the situation is:

  1. Australians throw out up to 20% of the food they purchase (that is about $1,036 in food thrown out of the average household every year)
  2. Australian households waste 3-4 million tonnes of food each year
  3. Australian businesses waste another 2 million tonnes of food each year
  4. Throwing out food impacts the environment due to increased emissions from landfill and the waste of resources used to get the food to you in the first place
  5. 20-40% of food is rejected at the farm/markets before it even gets to a shop because it doesn’t look good enough
  6. Nationally, the cost of Australian household food waste is $8 billion

The problem is so big that the Australian government has launched a national food waste strategy investing $1.37 million over 24 mths to support reduction in food waste from businesses however, that’s not where the biggest waste is happening and for me personally, I feel like the mere fact that the government is stepping into this problem with investment of our tax payers dollars shows that we as humans are not stepping up to our responsibilities.

I have been working with Mandy Schultz from Luv-A-Berry farm to support her stand against food waste. Mandy started a Facebook group called “Our war on Waste” and has coordinated with other farmers in her area to reduce the berries that they grow from going to waste.

I will be interviewing Mandy on my podcast in the coming weeks so I won’t go too much into her story. Mandy has seen a problem and decided to do something about it and as a result, she has thousands of people following her, joining her cause and showing up to her car park parties every Saturday morning to buy her berries in fresh, frozen and freeze dried form.

What are you doing? Are you doing anything? What if taking action on your personal food waste supported you to have a happier healthier life? Would you do something then?

Every time you look at a problem and despair that it is too big, that you can’t influence the outcome, you give away your power. This increases your overall feelings of stress about life and leads to a much lower quality of life overall.

If you take full responsibility for everything in your life then you are empowered to be the change and make an impact. From this viewpoint, you may accomplish more than you believe you can. Whether you feel overwhelmed by a problem or empowered to challenge it has more to do with your inner state of belief systems than with the external cause of the problem. History has shown over and over humans achieving extraordinary things due to a self-belief that they could actually make a change. Nelson Mandela broke apartheid in South Africa; Mother Teresa devoted her life to serving the poor around the world and became a symbol of charitable selflessness, there are loads of other examples. These people were ordinary people from ordinary backgrounds doing extraordinary things.

Accepting responsibility empowers us to become happy; it is a form of self-respect and is a deep internal system of accountability. It empowers you to make changes and become the change you want to see.

Sources

http://www.foodwise.com.au/foodwaste/food-waste-fast-facts/

http://www.environment.gov.au/protection/waste-resource-recovery/food-waste

Credit for Podcast intro: http://www.purple-planet.com

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